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Treatment at Discovery Behavioral Health

Discovery Behavioral Health is dedicated to providing access to the highest quality evidence-based treatment available.  Discovery is committed to offering the full continuum of care so that each individual is able to access the most appropriate intervention for their symptoms.  Discovery believes that recovery does not end upon discharge and grants you a lifelong support system as you continue to build resiliency in recovery through free recovery tools, free in-person and online weekly support groups, and an extensive alumni community that helps create an environment of constant growth and healing.  Here is more information about just a few of the evidence-based approaches used at Discovery:

Stages of Change

The Stages of Change is a widely applicable and well reputed evidence-based approach based on the transtheoretical model. The Stages of Change is founded on meeting the individual where they are at with regard to the change process. The six stages of change are Pre-Contemplation (prior to acknowledging the need to change), Contemplation (considering making a change), Preparation (planning or preparing for change), Action (making the change in behavior), Maintenance (maintaining the change), and Stability (when a behavior has been resolved or eliminated). The Stages of Change put into practice means that at every touch point each client is treated with the utmost empathy and in accordance with specific interventions that have demonstrated efficacy at each of the six stages of change for each clinical issue and focus of treatment. 

Stages of Change

The Stages of Change is a widely applicable and well reputed evidence-based approach based on the transtheoretical model. The Stages of Change is founded on meeting the individual where they are at with regard to the change process. The six stages of change are Pre-Contemplation (prior to acknowledging the need to change), Contemplation (considering making a change), Preparation (planning or preparing for change), Action (making the change in behavior), Maintenance (maintaining the change), and Stability (when a behavior has been resolved or eliminated). The Stages of Change put into practice means that at every touch point each client is treated with the utmost empathy and in accordance with specific interventions that have demonstrated efficacy at each of the six stages of change for each clinical issue and focus of treatment. 

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based approach to  psychotherapy that combines parts of cognitive behavioral therapy with principles of mindfulness and it has been found to be effective with a variety of mental health conditions and symptomatology.  Traditional dialectal behavior therapy focuses on four domains: emotional regulation, interpersonal effectiveness, distress tolerance, and mindfulness.

Exposure and Response Prevention

Exposure and Response Prevention is a type of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that systematically helps clients get comfortable with situations, objects, or experiences that would normally create anxiety or elicit a fear or avoidance response.  Exposure and Response Prevention is highly individualized and typically conducted with support from an expert in real- life scenarios. Exposure and Response Prevention is an evidence-based approach used for a multitude of mental health diagnoses including eating disorders and anxiety disorders. 

Exposure and Response Prevention

Exposure and Response Prevention is a type of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that systematically helps clients get comfortable with situations, objects, or experiences that would normally create anxiety or elicit a fear or avoidance response.  Exposure and Response Prevention is highly individualized and typically conducted with support from an expert in real- life scenarios. Exposure and Response Prevention is an evidence-based approach used for a multitude of mental health diagnoses including eating disorders and anxiety disorders. 

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an evidence-based treatment for trauma and other conditions. Typically an eight-phase treatment technique it is used by therapists and includes brief, interrupted exposures to the traumatic event, eye movement tracking, and recall of feelings and emotions associated with the trauma.  The rapid eye movement approach allows the individual to process differently and allows for empowerment and strength to replace the fear and anger.  The opened emotional wound can be transformed into a scar of strength. EMDR therapy includes focusing on the past traumatic experience, the present triggers and emotions associated with this past experience and the development of skills and thought processes needed to combat these negative feelings in the future and prevent these actions from occurring again.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy is an evidence-based approach used with a variety of mental health symptoms and diagnoses perhaps most commonly depression and anxiety.  In the treatment of depression, cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on reducing depressive symptoms by recognizing the thought patterns, emotions, beliefs and attitudes toward oneself and their environment that contribute to symptoms of depression. In anxiety treatment for example, cognitive behavioral treatment uses a combination of interventions such as exposure, applied-relaxation, psychoeducation, cognitive re-structuring and problem-solving skills in order to provide relief of the anxiety symptoms. 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy is an evidence-based approach used with a variety of mental health symptoms and diagnoses perhaps most commonly depression and anxiety.  In the treatment of depression, cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on reducing depressive symptoms by recognizing the thought patterns, emotions, beliefs and attitudes toward oneself and their environment that contribute to symptoms of depression. In anxiety treatment for example, cognitive behavioral treatment uses a combination of interventions such as exposure, applied-relaxation, psychoeducation, cognitive re-structuring and problem-solving skills in order to provide relief of the anxiety symptoms. 

Overview of the Different Levels of Care (IP, RTC, PHP, IOP, OP)

The appropriate level of care, whether an individual is diagnosed with a substance use, mental health, or eating disorder is typically determined by a treatment professional or treatment team who takes the time to conduct a thorough evaluation. It is important to gain a complete understanding of the nature of the individual's unique presentation and symptoms in order to determine the most appropriate intervention and intensity of treatment. Providing the most fitting level of care can help prevent potential serious complications such as overdose or suicide. An individual may step-up or down several times throughout the course of their recovery based on their presenting symptoms and clinical needs. There are five different levels of care (in order from the most intense to least intense which is recommended based on the seriousness of the symptoms):

Inpatient Care

Inpatient, sometimes referred to as acute treatment, is the highest level of care and typically involves more medical and nursing oversight in order to ensure the safety of the individual. The acute inpatient level of care is recommended for individuals who are medically unstable (eg. low heart rate, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac events, orthostatic vitals) or psychiatrically unstable (eg. suicidal and unable to contract for safety, suicidality with intent to do harm, intent to do harm to others). Depending on acuity and progress in treatment, length of stay in this level of care average from a few days to one-two weeks. Once the individual has been stabilized treatment is coordinated for a step-down to a lower level of care.

Residential Treatment

Residential treatment, or subacute treatment, is one step below an acute inpatient setting and also provides 24-hour a day monitoring but the focus of attention and intervention tends to be more clinical and psychotherapeutic in nature (vs medical). Residential treatment allows for the opportunity to provide monitoring, diagnostic services, and treatment to individuals who are experiencing severe symptoms that significantly impair their day to day functioning. Individuals in residential treatment typically receive 30-35 groups per week, seven individual sessions per week (3-4 individual therapy sessions with primary therapist, dietary consult, and individual consultations with the program psychiatrist and physician), and weekly family treatment where anyone from the client's primary social support system is encouraged to participate. The typical length of stay at the residential level of care is 30-60 days.

Partial Hospitalization (Day Treatment)

Partial hospitalization treatment, otherwise known as day treatment, is a time-limited, intensive treatment averaging six hours per day, three-seven days per week. This level of care is appropriate for someone that lives within proximity to these programs and is stable enough to be living in their home environment. Individuals appropriate for day treatment are those whose symptoms and behaviors do not require more structured support and/or interventions in the evening or night. For example, a teen who is sneaking out in the middle of the night engaging in high-risk behaviors may not be appropriate for day treatment. Similarly, someone drinking or using drugs in excess in the evening or an individual who is binging and purging during the night may also not be appropriate for partial hospitalization or day treatment. Partial day treatment programs include multiple group therapy sessions per week, individual therapy, consultation with a psychiatrist and medication monitoring, and family therapy or sessions with the clients primary support system. The length of stay averages anywhere from two-twelve weeks.

Intensive Outpatient Treatment

A typical intensive outpatient treatment program (IOP) requires individuals to have at least nine hours of therapy per week, which is usually a combination of group or individual therapy. In general these nine hours of treatment per week are divided up into three hour sessions three - five evenings per week for 12-16 weeks duration. Once this 12-16 week program is successfully completed, the individual may step down into a "maintenance" therapy group on a regular outpatient basis that may meet once per week. The average group size for a mental health intensive outpatient treatment program is 8-15 individuals. Just like any other level of care, a highly qualified clinician performs a thorough individual screening and assessment to evaluate whether intensive outpatient care is appropriate or if a higher-level of care is needed.

Outpatient Treatment

Outpatient treatment is considered the lowest level of care. An individual who meets criteria may detox on an outpatient basis meaning they are able to safely discontinue from a substance they have been using under regular weekly supervision while living at home and continuing on in their day to day life. There is wide variety in the types of outpatient settings and they all involve office visits with no overnight stay. Some are based in community mental health centers whereas others are located in hospitals or outpatient clinics.

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